Overweight & Obesity

 

Note: Error bars are used to indicate the error, or uncertainty, in a reported measurement. Confidence intervals are not available for all geographies.

Why is this important?

Obesity can have negative health effects on individuals and also result in increased costs to both the individual and society at large. Individuals who are overweight or obese are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, osteoarthritis, heart disease, hypertension, work disability, and sleep apnea.[i] Obese children are at greater risk of psychological and psychiatric problems.[ii] One study found that, to the individual, obesity increases health care costs 36 percent and medication costs 77 percent, compared with those in a normal weight range.[iii] In Oregon, the estimated medical cost related to obesity among adults was $781 million for 2003, representing 5.7 percent of Oregon’s total health care bill. Of this, obesity-attributable Medicare expenditures were estimated at $145 million, representing 6 percent of Medicare costs, and Medicaid expenditures reached $180 million, representing 8.8 percent of Medicaid costs in Oregon.[iv]

Metadata


[i]Tommy Visscher and Jacob Seidell, "The Public Health Impact of Obesity," Annual Review of Public Health 22, (2001): 355-375.

Roland Sturm, "The Effects of Obesity, Smoking, And Drinking On Medical Problems and Costs," Health Affairs 21, no. 2 (2002): 245-253.

[ii] JJ Reilly, "Health Consequences of Obesity," Archives of Disease in Childhood 88 (2003): 748–752.

[iii] Roland Sturm, "The Effects of Obesity, Smoking, And Drinking On Medical Problems and Costs," Health Affairs 21, no. 2 (2002): 245-253.

[iv] Washington DOH, 2004-2006; Oregon DHS, 2007